Saturday, January 24, 2015

Edfu Explorer Online

Edfu Explorer Online
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Der Edfu Explorer Online ist eine Datenbankplattform, die das Edfu-Projekt der Akadamie der Wissenschaften zu Göttingen zur Verfügung stellt. Er beinhaltet das Formular der Texte des Tempels von Edfu, soweit es durch die Publikationen 'Die Inschriften des Tempels von Edfu' bereits freigegeben wurde. Zur Zeit betrifft dies die Übersetzungen der Chassinat-Bände Edfou VII und VIII. Des weiteren hat der Nutzer Zugriff auf die mit den jeweiligen Datensätzen verbundenen Fotos des Edfu-Archives, sowie die betreffende Seite der Chassinat-Publikation.

 Für Formularstudien steht ein zweidimensionaler Plan des Tempels zur Verfügung, der den Zugriff auf die Chassinat-Seite über die Szenenposition ermöglicht. Innerhalb des Tempelplans wird der Szenentitel automatisch eingeblendet, sobald die Maus länger als eine Sekunde über dem Szenenfeld gehalten wird. 


 

Open Access Oriental Institute Nubian Expedition Publications

 [First posted in AWOL 31 March 2014, updated 24 January 2015]

 Oriental Institute Nubian Expedition Publications

The Oriental Institute Nubian Expedition

The Oriental Institute has had a long history of research in ancient Nubia.Oriental Institute Founder, James Henry Breasted traveled to southern Egypt and northern Sudan in 1905-07, to document ancient Egyptian and Nubian monuments. A selection of the Breasted Expedition photographs was exhibited in the Oriental Institute Museum in 2006. In addition to this early work by our founder, between 1960 and 1968 the Oriental Institute participated in the international archaeological campaign organized by UNESCO in the areas threatened by the construction of the Aswan High Dam. Nine volumes of final reports have been published. The Robert F. Picken Family Nubia Gallery, which opened in 2006, displays some of the approximately 15,000 objects brought back to the Oriental Institute as a result of the work in the 1960s.
The return of the Oriental Institute to Nubia began in 2006 with a preliminary reconnaissance trip to evaluate the possibility of participating in an archaeological salvage project in Sudan. The Merowe Dam Project at the 4th Cataract of the Nile, upon its completion in 2008, flooded an area of approximately 100 miles in the Nile Valley. Between January and March 2007, the Oriental Institute joined international teams in the 4th Cataract region in archaeological investigation of the area, an area that had, prior to the salvage project, received virtually no attention.
Oriental Institute excavations in the 4th Cataract were supported by the Packard Humanities Institute and National Geographic.

The Nubia Salvage Project





INTRODUCTION

The Oriental Institute participated in the UNESCO international salvage excavation project in the reservoir area of the Aswan High Dam in Upper Egypt in 1960-64. The project was directed by Keith Seele, Professor of Egyptology at the Institute. The expedition was based on the former Cook tourist boat "Fostat", accompanied by another houseboat, the "Barbara", a tug boat, and a motor launch, all purchased and modified to provide mobile housing, laboratories and storage space. In the first season the project produced an epigraphic record of the Beit El-Wali Temple, near the High Dam. In subsequent seasons the expedition moved its little fleet up the Nile to a new concession between the temples at Abu Simbel and the border of the Sudanese Republic. Excavations were conducted in a monastery, at habitation sites, and in a number of cemeteries extending for miles along both banks of the Nile. These excavations contributed information on every period of Egyptian Nubia from the Old Kingdom through Coptic times.
After the death of Professor Seele in 1971, the Institute initiated a project to complete the publication of the results of the Egyptian Nubia excavations. The publication project was entrusted to Bruce Williams, Ph.D., a graduate of the University of Chicago in Egyptology. The first two volumes were published before Williams was assigned to the project. Since then Williams has completed eight monumental monographs (1986-93) that will stand as the fundamental sources for the archaeology and history of Egyptian Nubia. Williams is currently working on two additional volumes. Another two volumes are also in preparation by collaborators, including one Ph.D. dissertation. Williams has devoted his entire academic career to the Nubia publications. His dedication is admirable and the Institute takes pride in the fact that the Nubia publication project is near completion.
Because the Nubian expedition was a part of the UNESCO salvage project, the Egyptian Government granted export license for a large collection of objects recovered by the expedition. These artifacts are now a part of the perminent collection of the Institute and will serve as a valuable resource for generations of scholars as new questions are raised and new techniques of analysis are introduced. Two museum exhibitions of Nubian materials from the collection have been mounted; one of magnificent textiles at the Art Institute, and a fine educational exhibition in the Oriental Institute Museum. The exhibit in our museum, Vanished Kingdoms of the Nile: The Recovery of Ancient Nubia, attracted many enthuiastic new visitors to the museum and received a "Superior Achievement" award from the Congress of Illinois Historical Societies and Museums in 1992, as well as considerable press coverage, including a favorable review in the New York Times.
The Oriental Institute has had a long history of research in ancient Nubia.Oriental Institute Founder, James Henry Breasted traveled to southern Egypt and northern Sudan in 1905-07, to document ancient Egyptian and Nubian monuments. A selection of the Breasted Expedition photographs was exhibited in the Oriental Institute Museum in 2006. In addition to this early work by our founder, between 1960 and 1968 the Oriental Institute participated in the international archaeological campaign organized by UNESCO in the areas threatened by the construction of the Aswan High Dam. Nine volumes of final reports have been published. The Robert F. Picken Family Nubia Gallery, which opened in 2006, displays some of the approximately 15,000 objects brought back to the Oriental Institute as a result of the work in the 1960s.

The return of the Oriental Institute to Nubia began in 2006 with a preliminary reconnaissance trip to evaluate the possibility of participating in an archaeological salvage project in Sudan. The Merowe Dam Project at the 4th Cataract of the Nile, upon its completion in 2008, flooded an area of approximately 100 miles in the Nile Valley. Between January and March 2007, the Oriental Institute joined international teams in the 4th Cataract region in archaeological investigation of the area, an area that had, prior to the salvage project, received virtually no attention.

Oriental Institute excavations in the 4th Cataract were supported by the Packard Humanities Institute and National Geographic.

2007 Excavations

2008 Excavations

Oriental Institute Nubian Expedition (OINE) [All available for open access download]
 
And for an up to date list of all Oriental Institute publications available online see

Open Access Digital Library: Bibliothek Goussen

[First posted 10/2/09. Updated 24 January 2015]

Bibliothek Goussen
http://s2w.hbz-nrw.de/ulbbn/domainresource/static/graphics/kopfgrafik_digitalisierung.png

The Goussen library collection is a specialist library for oriental church history. It contains prints in Western classical and modern languages, but predominantly prints in oriental languages such as Syrian, Coptic, Ethiopian, Arabic, Armenian and Georgian languages from the 16th to the 20th century (the focus is on the 18th and the 19th century). The former owner Heinrich Goussen (1863 – 1927) collected nearly every print within the language groups that had ever been published about the subject. The collection contains numerous rare or valuable oriental prints. There could hardly a collection be put together as completely as here, not even from the holdings of large European libraries.


Friday, January 23, 2015

Now Available Online – Amphoteroglossia: A Poetics of the Twelfth-Century Medieval Greek Novel

Now Available Online – Amphoteroglossia: A Poetics of the Twelfth-Century Medieval Greek Novel

Open Access Journal: Çatal Newsletters

[First posted in AWOL 9 December 2013, updated 23 January 2015]

Çatal Newsletters 
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The Project issues annual Newslettters which are designed for the Friends of Çatalhöyük and aim to keep the Friends and inerested parties informed of the activities of the Project and of the different aspects of the research being conducted at Çatalhöyük. They contain summaries of the work and discoveries that were made during that year's excavation season.
    Çatal News 21 - 2014 (Download PDF)

    2014

    Çatal News 20 - 2013 (Download PDF)

    2013

    Çatal News 19 - 2012 (Download PDF)

    2012

    Çatal News 18 - 2011 (Download PDF)

    2011

    Çatal News 17 - 2010 (Download PDF)

    2010

    Çatal News 16 - 2009 (Download PDF)

    2009

    Çatal News 15 - 2008 (Download PDF)

    2008

    Çatal News 14 - 2007 (Download PDF)

    2007

    Çatal News 13 - 2006 (Download PDF)

    2006

    Çatal News 12 - 2005

    2005

    Çatal News 11 - 2004

    2004

    Çatal News 10 - 2003

    2003

    Çatal News 09 - 2002

    2002

    Çatal News 08 - 2001

    2001

    Çatal News 07 - 2000

    2000

    Çatal News 06 - 1999

    1999

    Çatal News 05 - 1998

    1998

    Çatal News 04 - 1997

    1997

    Çatal News 03 - 1996

    1996 - Dec

    Çatal News 02 - 1996

    1996 - April

    Çatal News 01 - 1995

    1995

    Open Access Journal: Res Militares: The Official Newsletter of the Society of Ancient Military Historians

    Res Militares: The Official Newsletter of the Society of Ancient Military Historians
    ISSN: 1533-4708
    The Society of Ancient Military Historians is an organization dedicated to the promotion of the study of military history and warfare in the entire Ancient World (west and east). Members sponsor and contribute to the publication of our newsletter, Res Militares. Our leadership works with and within the American Philological Association and the Association of Ancient Historians to disseminate information of interest to members and arrange contact between our members and within the larger academic community.

    Open Access Journal: Hadashot Arkheologiyot - Excavations and Survey in Israel

    [First posted in AWOL 23 October 2009. Updated 23 January 2015]

    Hadashot Arkheologiyot - Excavations and Survey in Israel
    ISSN: 1565-5334
    http://www.hadashot-esi.org.il/images/JOURNAL1_01eng.jpg
    Hadashot Arkheologiyot – Excavations and Surveys in Israel (HA-ESI) has been published in print since 1961 by the Israel Department of Antiquities and Museums (IDAM) and since 1990 by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA). The journal contains preliminary reports of excavations and surveys in Israel, as well as final reports of small-scale excavations and surveys; it also publishes archaeological finds recorded during inspection activities. The journal is bilingual, Hebrew and English; reports submitted in English are translated into Hebrew and vice versa.
      The e-journal www.hadashot-esi.org.il is the digital format of HA-ESI, replacing the printed version. The first digital publication of the journal (No. 116, 2004) is a reflection of the last printed volume. From 2005 onward, the journal will be published on-line only – each year will receive a volume number, continuing the numbering of the printed journal (e.g., No. 117 = 2005, No. 118 = 2006, etc.).   The e-journal is an unlimited data base of archeological reports, including photographs, maps, plans and pottery figures. The reports can be searched by keywords or by means of an interactive map. The results of both types of searches can be printed.
      The reports submitted to the e-journal will be edited in the same manner as in the printed journal (see Guide to Contributors). They will be published on-line with the completion of their editing and translation, and will be ascribed to a specific issue according to the year of publication (issue no. = year of publication). A final excavation report is marked with as asterix*. Announcements of new publications will appear on the Home Page of the e-journal. Prints of reports are available from the web site for personal and educational use only.
      116 (2004)
     

      117 (2005)
     

      118 (20006) 119 (2007)  120 (2008) 121 (2009) 122 (2010) 123 (2011) 124 (2012) 125 (2013)126 (2014)










     
    Past Issues